Enjoy Your Own Organic Produce With These Tips

With the current organic trend, holistic lifestyles are common these days.

Those who live this lifestyle grow their own foods for their health benefits and they tend to do this via organic gardening. Read up on some great organic tips below.

When boiling or steaming vegetables, keep the water that the vegetables were cooked in and let it cool. Use the water to water the garden with. It is packed with all the vitamins and minerals that were in the vegetables when they were cooked and will help the plants grow as a natural plant food.

Feed your plants. The way your plants are growing can tell you what nutrients are lacking and need replacing. Some plants take up a lot of nutrients early in the growing season and quickly need a new supply. Look for signs of deficiency such as yellowing leaves and stunted growth. Feed the plant with a general purpose fertilizer, unless it has specific requirements. Foliage plants, for instance, prefer a fertilizer that is high in nitrogen.

When digging holes for your plants, don’t be a neat freak. Don’t dig holes that are perfect, with sides that are as smooth as can be. You are actually making it more difficult for the root system of the new plant to take hold in the soil. For best results, keep your holes a little messy.

If you’re looking for a natural fungicide to protect the seed flats or trays that you plant this fall or winter, the solution is easy. Simply put a dusting of sphagnum moss that is milled or ground across the top of the flats or sprinkle it between each row of seeds. The acid in the moss helps to prevent the development of fungus, keeping your seedlings strong and healthy.

Farmer planting young seedlings of lettuce salad in the vegetable garden

When fall has arrived, it is time to plant the edibles for the autumn. Rather than using clay pots or planters for your lettuce and kale, plant them in a pumpkin! Slice a hole around the stem, and pull the pumpkin top out. Then remove the guts and use Wilt-Pruf to cover the insides and prevent rot. Once you have completed this, start planting!

Improve the health of your soil before your plant your crops and seed. Three or four weeks beforehand use organic compounds like mulch, fertilizer, and compost to increase the nutrient value and retention of your soil. It will also improve the retention of water, create a soil buffer, and more.

Recycle your old pantyhose for garden use! Pantyhose make exceptional garden ties as they are very malleable, very strong and yet extremely soft, so they won’t saw into the plants you are tying up. Best of all, since you are recycling, this solution is another great way to save money.

You should get a wheelbarrow and a kneeling stool for garden work. Gardening can take a toll on the knees, but a small ergonomic stool will be a comfortable solution. Gardeners usually need a wheelbarrow to move the heavy dirt and other objects so they are a good item to buy.

When you first plant a seedling, make sure that you keep the soil moist until it germinates. This is very important because, if the soil dries out, you risk the seedling dying. Once the seedling does germinate, the soil can be allowed to dry in between watering, but remember that it is still delicate and needs to be taken care of.

Collect your dirt for a soil analysis to see the nutrients your soil needs. You can get this tested at a local university’s agriculture department, usually for a fee. The fee is well worth it usually because then you will know what nutrients your dirt needs to have a garden that is successful.

Plant fruits and vegetables that you know you like. If you have children, having them help in the garden will make them want to eat the food that they grow. You will be able to save money on your fresh produce as well as know that your family is eating the best produce around.

To naturally rid your soil of nematodes, which are soil-dwelling pests that can hurt tomatoes and potatoes, use marigolds. The chemicals released by the marigolds’ roots and decaying leaves is toxic to nematodes. Plant marigolds near your tomatoes or potatoes, or till them into the soil before planting.

A great tip when opening up your own organic garden is to mist your mix with a spray bottle. If you do not have a spray bottle, then set your trays in water. This is needed so that your mix will get the proper amount of moisture from below the surface.

Any organic gardening project is immediately susceptible to fungal diseases that can rot and ruin your seeds or seedlings before they even have a chance to grow. In order to prevent this, you should use sphagnum moss which acts as a natural fungicide. When your seeds are planted into the soil, apply the moss immediately after planting. On the other hand, if your seeds are exposed to sunlight, you should apply the moss first, and then deposit the seeds on the moss. You only need to use a sprinkle of moss.

Care for your compost. Cover your compost pile with a lid, tarp or black plastic. Sunlight will kill the bacteria that do the composting, so the outer layers of a compost pile that is exposed to the sun will not break down. Water the compost pile regularly, keeping it evenly moist. Do not over-water, as a soggy compost pile will rot. Turn the pile every two to five days to aerate and provide oxygen to the bacteria. If necessary, add a composting activator to speed up the process.

Over-watering can essentially drown the roots of plants, making them unable to grow well. Only water as necessary when there is no rain in the forecast, or for plants which need extra watering. You may be able to skip watering because of the pending weather.

The more you know about the ins and outs of organic gardening, the more effective you’ll be. This article is just the tip of the ice-berg when it comes to organic gardening information.

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